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Higher serum concentrations of dietary antioxidants are associated with lower levels of inflammatory biomarkers during the year after hip fracture

Author:
D’Adamo, Christopher R., Miller, Ram R., Shardell, Michelle D., Orwig, Denise L., Hochberg, Marc C., Ferrucci, Luigi, Semba, Richard D., Yu-Yahiro, Janet A., Magaziner, Jay, Hicks, Gregory E.
Source:
Clinical nutrition 2012 v.31 no.5 pp. 659-665
ISSN:
0261-5614
Subject:
alpha-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, anti-inflammatory activity, antioxidants, biomarkers, blood serum, clinical trials, equations, hip fractures, inflammation, interleukin-6, lutein, nutrient intake, patients, people, tumor necrosis factor-alpha
Abstract:
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Chronic inflammation impairs recovery among the 1.6 million people who suffer from hip fracture annually. Vitamin E and the carotenoids are two classes of dietary antioxidants with profound anti-inflammatory effects, and the goal of this study was to assess whether higher post-fracture concentrations of these antioxidants were associated with lower levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and the soluble receptor for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (sTNF-αR1), two common markers of inflammation. METHODS: Serum concentrations of the dietary antioxidants and inflammatory markers were assessed at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 month follow-up visits among 148 hip fracture patients from The Baltimore Hip Studies. Generalized estimating equations modeled the relationship between baseline and time-varying antioxidant concentrations and inflammatory markers. RESULTS: Higher post-fracture concentrations of vitamin E and the carotenoids were associated with lower levels of inflammatory markers. Associations were strongest at baseline, particularly between the α-tocopherol form of vitamin E and sTNF-αR1 (p = 0.05) and total carotenoids and both sTNF-αR1(p = 0.01) and IL-6 (p = 0.05). Higher baseline and time-varying α-carotene and time-varying lutein concentrations were also associated with lower sTNF-αR1 at all post-fracture visits (p ≤ 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that a clinical trial increasing post-fracture intake of vitamin E and the carotenoids may be warranted.
Agid:
1122628