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Influence of soil pH and fertility programs on centipedegrass

Author:
Johnson, B.J., Carrow, R.N.
Source:
Agronomy journal 1992 v.84 no.1 pp. 21-26
ISSN:
0002-1962
Subject:
Eremochloa ophiuroides, lawns and turf, soil pH, NPK fertilizers, stand density, crop quality, application rate, Georgia
Abstract:
Improper centipedegrass [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack] fertilization often results in a lower quality turf and progressive decline. Since the grass is best adapted to low fertility and the optimum pH range is uncertain, an experiment was initiated at Griffin, GA, to determine the influence of soil pH and fertility programs on centipedegrass. Soil pH did not influence the growth of centipedegrass during the first 2 yr after sprigging (1986 and 1987) when the annual fertility program (N-P-K, kg ha-1) was greater than or equal to 100-44-83. When N-P-K was reduced less than or equal to 50-22-42 kg ha-1, centipedegrass growth in soil with pH of 6.2 or 6.7 was better than at 5.1. Soil pH did not influence turf quality or density from 1988 through 1990 when fertilized with 100-44-83 kg N-P-K ha-1. However, soil pH influenced the quality and density of centipedegrass when fertilized at rates greater than 100-44-83 kg N-P-K ha-1. Decline of centipedegrass occurred during spring 1988 when the grass was treated with 200-88-166 kg N-P-K ha-1 and grown in soil with pH greater than or equal to 6.2 compared with no decline when grown in soil with pH 5.1. Turf quality and density in 1990 was higher in late April when the grass was grown in soil with pH of 6.2 than 5.1, but soil pH differences were not observed by late May. Therefore, soil pH level was not an important factor when fertilized annually at 100-44-83 kg N-P-K ha-1, but at lower fertilizer rates, the growth was best during the first 2 yr after sprigging when pH was greater than or equal to 6.2.
Agid:
1381771