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Sweeneners--a review

Author:
Inglett, G.E.
Source:
Food technology 1981 v.35 no.3 pp. 37
ISSN:
0015-6639
Subject:
corn syrup, sucrose, fructose, sugar substitutes, sweetness, sugars, artificial sweeteners, sweeteners, protein sweeteners, nonnutritive sweeteners, sugar alcohols, high fructose corn syrup
Abstract:
Abstract: The natural sweetener, sucrose, is found in many foods, primarily cane, beet, and fruits. Enzyme technology has led to the development of other natural sweeteners including corn sweeteners and high-fructose corn syrups manufactured from corn starch hydrolysis. Their commercial production has increased rapidly with applications in soft drinks, desserts, confections, canned fruits, jellies, jams, baked goods, salad dressings and breakfast cereals. The sweet polyhydric alcohols (sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol and xylitol) impart low levels of sweetness. Intense sweeteners of natural origin include phyllodulcin, stevioside, glycyrrhizin (50 x sweeter than sucrose), Lo Han fruit (400 x sweeter than sucrose) and osladin. Proteins more than 1000 x sweeter than sucrose have been isolated from miracle fruit, serendipity berries and katemfe. Synthetic compounds with intense sweetness include saccharin, cyclamate (banned by the FDA in 1969), peptide-based sweeteners, dihydrochalcone sweeteners from citrus peels, acesulfame-K and aldoxine analogs.
Agid:
26130
Handle:
10113/26130