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Pump rate and cooked temperature effects on pork loin instrumental, sensory descriptive and consumer-rated characteristics

Author:
Baublits, R.T., Meullenet, J.F., Sawyer, J.T., Mehaffey, J.M., Saha, A.
Source:
Meat science 2006 v.72 no.4 pp. 741-750
ISSN:
0309-1740
Subject:
pork, loins (meat cut), chops, marinating, sodium tripolyphosphate, sodium chloride, salt concentration, cooking, internal temperature, cooking quality, meat quality, pH, texture, hardness, shear strength, flavor, juiciness, food acceptability, consumer acceptance, sensory evaluation
Abstract:
Fresh pork loins (n = 15; muscle sections, n = 30) were utilized to evaluate the effects of pump rate (0%, 6%, or 12%) with a solution of sodium tripolyphosphate and sodium chloride (0.4% and 1.0% targeted final product concentrations, respectively), and cooked endpoint internal temperature (71 or 82 degrees C) on instrumental texture, descriptive sensory profiles and consumer acceptance. Loins enhanced at a 12% pump rate had a higher (P < 0.05) pH than untreated loins. While there were no differences in Warner-Bratzler shear force due to cooked endpoint temperature, chops enhanced at a 12% pump rate had lower (P < 0.05) shear force values than untreated chops. Additionally, chops enhanced at 6% or 12% pump rates had lower (P < 0.05) razor shear force values than untreated chops. Descriptive sensory analyses revealed that chops cooked to 71 degrees C had a more intense (P < 0.05) blood serum flavor than chops cooked to 82 degrees C. Consumers found chops cooked to 82 degrees C to have a more acceptable overall flavor than chops cooked to 71 degrees C. Untreated chops had less intense (P < 0.05) pork fat flavor, and more intense (P < 0.05) blood serum, livery, and cardboard or oxidized flavor characteristics than chops enhanced at 6% or 12% pump rates. Additionally, sensory panelists reported chops enhanced at 6% or 12% pump rates to generally be more tender than untreated chops. Consumers reported a higher (P < 0.05) overall acceptability for chops enhanced at 6% or 12% pump rates. Furthermore, both sensory panelists and consumers reported chops enhanced at 6% or 12% pump rates to be similar (P > 0.05) in juiciness, regardless of endpoint temperature. However, untreated chops cooked to 82 degrees C were less juicy (P < 0.05) than untreated chops cooked to 71 degrees C, suggesting retained palatability when enhanced chops are cooked to more abusive temperatures.
Agid:
2723978