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The biology of Canadian weeds. 122. Lactuca serriola L

Author:
Weaver, S.E., Downs, M.P.
Source:
Canadian journal of plant science 2003 v.83 no.3 pp. 619-628
ISSN:
0008-4220
Subject:
Lactuca sativa, Lactuca serriola, acetolactate synthase, autumn, crops, dormancy, flowering, herbicides, lettuce, overwintering, reduced tillage, seedlings, seeds, spring, summer, weeds, winter, Australia, Canada, Eurasia, Southeastern United States
Abstract:
Lactuca serriola (prickly lettuce, compass plant) is a winter or summer annual, introduced to Canada from Eurasia, and found in all provinces except Newfoundland. It occupies a variety of disturbed sites, and is becoming an increasing problem in crops grown with reduced tillage. Most seedlings emerge in autumn and form overwintering rosettes, with a smaller peak of emergence in spring. Flowering occurs from July through September. Seed production is proportional to stem height, and ranges up to 200 000 seeds per plant. The wind-dispersed seeds have no primary dormancy and form only a short-term seed bank (1 to 3 yr). Many populations in the western United States and southern Australia have developed resistance to Group 2 herbicides, which inhibit the enzyme acetolactate synthase. Prickly lettuce is closely related to, and inter-fertile with, cultivated lettuce, Lactuca sativa L.
Agid:
318772