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Comparison of caudal and pre-scrotal castration for management of perineal hernia in dogs between 2004 and 2014

Author:
Snell, WL, Orsher, RJ, Larenza-Menzies, MP, Popovitch, CA
Source:
New Zealand veterinary journal 2015 v.63 no.5 pp. 272-275
ISSN:
1176-0710
Subject:
castration, dogs, erythema, heat, hernia, males, muscles, patients, postoperative complications, Pennsylvania
Abstract:
AIMS: To compare peri- and post-operative complications associated with caudal scrotal castration (CSC) and perineal hernia repair with pre-scrotal castration (PSC) in conjunction with another surgical procedure. METHODS: Medical records were reviewed for 51 intact male dogs that were admitted to the Veterinary Emergency and Surgical Center, Levittown, PA, and underwent a CSC and perineal hernia repair using an internal obturator muscle flap (IOMF) between 2004 and 2014. Perioperative, and major and minor post-operative complications noted within the 2 week follow up period were reported and compared to 91 intact male dogs that underwent a PSC in conjunction with a second surgical procedure. RESULTS: There were no recorded perioperative or major post-operative complications in either group. There were 3/51 (6%) minor post-operative complications in the CSC group compared to 6/91 (7%) in the PSC group. There were 2/51 (4%) and 4/91 (4%) cases that developed heat, erythema and swelling associated with the incision site and 1/51 (2%) and 2/91 (2%) cases that developed scrotal swelling in the CSC and PSC groups, respectively. Overall, there was no difference in the prevalence of minor complications between the two groups (p=0.86). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Caudal scrotal castration was not associated with more perioperative or postoperative complications relative to PSC. Utilising the CSC approach eliminates the need to aseptically prepare and drape a second site when carrying out perineal hernia repair, as well as the need for patient repositioning. Thus, we recommend that CSC be the preferred surgical technique when performing orchiectomy in dogs concurrent with perineal hernia repair.
Agid:
3357699