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Patterns of invasion and colonization of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in North America as revealed by microsatellite genotypes

Author:
BRYAN, M.B., ZALINSKI, D., FILCEK, K.B., LIBANTS, S., LI, W., SCRIBNER, K.T.
Source:
Molecular ecology 2005 v.14 no.12 pp. 3757-3773
ISSN:
0962-1083
Subject:
Petromyzon marinus, analytical methods, coasts, community structure, ecosystems, fish, freshwater, genetic variation, genotype, habitats, lakes, microsatellite repeats, models, population structure, Europe, Lake Erie, Lake Ontario, Michigan, North Sea, Saint Lawrence River
Abstract:
Invasions by exotic organisms have had devastating affects on aquatic ecosystems, both ecologically and economically. One striking example of a successful invader that has dramatically affected fish community structure in freshwater lakes of North America is the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). We used eight microsatellite loci and multiple analytical techniques to examine competing hypotheses concerning the origins and colonization history of sea lamprey (n = 741). Analyses were based on replicated invasive populations from Lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior, populations of unknown origins from Lakes Ontario, Champlain, and Cayuga, and populations of anadromous putative progenitor populations in North America and Europe. Populations in recently colonized lakes were each established by few colonists through a series of genetic bottlenecks which resulted in lower allelic diversity in more recently established populations. The spatial genetic structure of invasive populations differed from that of native populations on the Atlantic coast, reflecting founder events and connectivity of invaded habitats. Anadromous populations were found to be panmictic (θP = 0.002; 95% CI = −0.003-0.006; P > 0.05). In contrast, there was significant genetic differentiation between populations in the lower and upper Great Lakes (θP = 0.007; P < 0.05; 95% CI = 0.003-0.009). Populations in Lakes Ontario, Champlain, and Cayuga are native. Alternative models that describe different routes and timing of colonization of freshwater habitats were examined using coalescent-based analyses, and demonstrated that populations likely originated from natural migrations via the St Lawrence River.
Agid:
463152