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A spatial genetic structure and effects of relatedness on mate choice in a wild bird population

Author:
FOERSTER, K., VALCU, M., JOHNSEN, A., KEMPENAERS, B.
Source:
Molecular ecology 2006 v.15 no.14 pp. 4555-4567
ISSN:
0962-1083
Subject:
females, microsatellite repeats, paternity, evolution, males, inbreeding, copulation, wild birds, inbreeding depression, population structure, Parus, immigration
Abstract:
Inbreeding depression, as commonly found in natural populations, should favour the evolution of inbreeding avoidance mechanisms. If natal dispersal, the first and probably most effective mechanism, does not lead to a complete separation of males and females from a common origin, a small-scale genetic population structure may result and other mechanisms to avoid inbreeding may exist. We studied the genetic population structure and individual mating patterns in blue tits (Parus caeruleus). The population showed a local genetic structure in two out of four years: genetic relatedness between individuals (estimated from microsatellite markers) decreased with distance. This pattern was mainly caused by immigrants to the study area; these, if paired with fellow immigrants, were more related than expected by chance. Since blue tits did not avoid inbreeding with their social partner, we examined if individuals preferred less related partners at later stages of the mate choice process. We found no evidence that females or males avoided inbreeding through extra-pair copulations or through mate desertion and postbreeding dispersal. Although the small-scale genetic population structure suggests that blue tits could use a simple rule of thumb to select less related mates, females did not generally prefer more distantly breeding extra-pair partners. However, the proportion of young fathered by an extra-pair male in mixed paternity broods depended on the genetic relatedness with the female. This suggests that there is a fertilization bias towards less related copulation partners and that blue tits are able to reduce the costs of inbreeding through a postcopulatory process.
Agid:
463450