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Effect of food supplementation (WIC) during pregnancy on birth weight

Author:
Metcoff, Jack., Costiloe, Paul, Crosby, Warren M., Dutta, Seshachalam., Sandstead, Harold H., Milne, David., Bodwell, C.E., Majors, Stephen H.
Source:
American journal of clinical nutrition 1985 v.41 no.5 pp. 933
ISSN:
0002-9165
Subject:
pregnant women, birth weight, food and nutrition programs, smoking (habit), maternal nutrition, nutritional status, disease prevention, WIC Program, risk
Abstract:
Extract: Of 824 women screened, 410 were enrolled at midpregnancy in a prospective, randomized, controlled nutrition intervention study. Of these, 226 were predicted as likely to have small or large babies, 184 to have average-sized babies. Two hundred thirty eight mothers received USDA Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Food Supplementation vouchers from midpregnancy, 172 did not. Leukocyte protein synthesis (as a cell model) was significantly higher by 36 weeks gestation in supplemented mothers. Mean birth weight of their babies was greater, 3254 vs. 3163 g, adjusted for sex, gestational age, prenatal visits, pregnancy interval, smoking, and previous low birth weight infants. Controlling for entry weight obviated the significance of the difference, except for WIC supplemented smokers whose babies were significantly heavier by + 168 g than those of unsupplemented smokers. WIC partially protects fetal growth in smokers. (Author)
Agid:
46881
Handle:
10113/46881