PubAg

Main content area

Oil sands mining and reclamation cause massive loss of peatland and stored carbon

Author:
Rooney, Rebecca C., Bayley, Suzanne E., Schindler, David W.
Source:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2012 v.109 no.13 pp. 4933-4937
ISSN:
0027-8424
Subject:
bitumen, carbon, carbon sequestration, ecosystem services, emissions, forests, habitats, lakes, mining, natural capital, oil sands, Alberta
Abstract:
We quantified the wholesale transformation of the boreal landscape by open-pit oil sands mining in Alberta, Canada to evaluate its effect on carbon storage and sequestration. Contrary to claims made in the media, peatland destroyed by open-pit mining will not be restored. Current plans dictate its replacement with upland forest and tailings storage lakes, amounting to the destruction of over 29,500 ha of peatland habitat. Landscape changes caused by currently approved mines will release between 11.4 and 47.3 million metric tons of stored carbon and will reduce carbon sequestration potential by 5,734–7,241 metric tons C/y. These losses have not previously been quantified, and should be included with the already high estimates of carbon emissions from oil sands mining and bitumen upgrading. A fair evaluation of the costs and benefits of oil sands mining requires a rigorous assessment of impacts on natural capital and ecosystem services.
Agid:
483835