PubAg

Main content area

Dietary plasma proteins attenuate the innate immunity response in a mouse model of acute lung injury

Author:
Maijó, Mònica, Miró, Lluïsa, Polo, Javier, Campbell, Joy, Russell, Louis, Crenshaw, Joe, Weaver, Eric, Moretó, Miquel, Pérez-Bosque, Anna
Source:
The British journal of nutrition 2012 v.107 no.6 pp. 867-875
ISSN:
1475-2662
Subject:
animal models, blood proteins, chemokine CCL2, chemokine CCL3, chemokine CCL4, chemokine CXCL1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, immune response, inflammation, innate immunity, interleukin-1alpha, interleukin-6, lipopolysaccharides, lungs, mice, monocytes, neutrophils, protein supplements, respiratory tract diseases, spray drying, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, weaning
Abstract:
We examined whether oral plasma protein supplements affect the innate immune response in a model of acute lung inflammation. Mice were fed diets supplemented with 8 % spray-dried plasma (SDP) or 2 % plasma Ig concentrate (IC) from day 19 (weaning) until day 34. The mice were challenged with intranasal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at day 33 (and killed 24 h later for cytokine and leucocyte analyses) or at day 34 (and killed 6 h later for cytokine determinations). In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), LPS increased the number of leucocytes by twenty-sevenfold, an effect that was partly prevented by both SDP and IC, and by twentyfold the percentage of activated monocytes, which was partly prevented by SDP. In the lung tissue, LPS increased the infiltrated leucocytes, and this effect was prevented in part by SDP. In unchallenged mice, both SDP and IC diets reduced the percentage of resident neutrophils and monocytes (P < 0·05). In the blood, both SDP and IC completely prevented LPS-dependent monocyte activation (CD14⁺; P < 0·05). LPS dramatically increased the concentration of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-6, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) and chemokines (CXCL1, CCL2, CCL3 and CCL4) in BALF. The acute response of cytokine production was reduced by 20–80 % by both SDP and IC. For chemokines, plasma supplements had no effect on LPS-induced CXCL1 expression but significantly reduced CCL2, CCL3 and CCL4 production (P < 0·05). The results support the view that dietary plasma proteins can be used to attenuate endotoxin-associated lung inflammation.
Agid:
5162112