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Ectomycorrhizal communities of ponderosa pine and lodgepole pine in the south-central Oregon pumice zone

Author:
Garcia, Maria O., Smith, Jane E., Luoma, Daniel L., Jones, Melanie D.
Source:
Mycorrhiza 2016 v.26 no.4 pp. 275-286
ISSN:
0940-6360
Subject:
Cenococcum geophilum, Inocybe, Pinus contorta var. latifolia, Pinus ponderosa, Rhizopogon, carbon, climate change, community structure, drought, ectomycorrhizae, environmental factors, forest ecosystems, mycorrhizal fungi, nitrates, nitrogen, ordination techniques, phosphorus, pumice, root tips, snowpack, soil pH, species diversity, summer, temperature, Deschutes National Forest, Oregon
Abstract:
Forest ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest of the USA are changing as a result of climate change. Specifically, rise of global temperatures, decline of winter precipitation, earlier loss of snowpack, and increased summer drought are altering the range of Pinus contorta. Simultaneously, flux in environmental conditions within the historic P. contorta range may facilitate the encroachment of P. ponderosa into P. contorta territory. Furthermore, successful pine species migration may be constrained by the distribution or co-migration of ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF). Knowledge of the linkages among soil fungal diversity, community structure, and environmental factors is critical to understanding the organization and stability of pine ecosystems. The objectives of this study were to establish a foundational knowledge of the EMF communities of P. ponderosa and P. contorta in the Deschutes National Forest, OR, USA, and to examine soil characteristics associated with community composition. We examined EMF root tips of P. ponderosa and P. contorta in soil cores and conducted soil chemistry analysis for P. ponderosa cores. Results indicate that Cenococcum geophilum, Rhizopogon salebrosus, and Inocybe flocculosa were dominant in both P. contorta and P. ponderosa soil cores. Rhizopogon spp. were ubiquitous in P. ponderosa cores. There was no significant difference in the species composition of EMF communities of P. ponderosa and P. contorta. Ordination analysis of P. ponderosa soils suggested that soil pH, plant-available phosphorus (Bray), total phosphorus (P), carbon (C), mineralizable nitrogen (N), ammonium (NH₄), and nitrate (NO₃) are driving EMF community composition in P. ponderosa stands. We found a significant linear relationship between EMF species richness and mineralizable N. In conclusion, P. ponderosa and P. contorta, within the Deschutes National Forest, share the same dominant EMF species, which implies that P. ponderosa may be able to successfully establish within the historic P. contorta range and dominant EMF assemblages may be conserved.
Agid:
5184268