PubAg

Main content area

Obesity is an independent risk factor for non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease: evidence from a meta‐analysis of 21 cohort studies

Author:
Li, L., Liu, D. ‐W., Yan, H. ‐Y., Wang, Z. ‐Y., Zhao, S. ‐H., Wang, B.
Source:
Obesity reviews 2016 v.17 no.6 pp. 510-519
ISSN:
1467-7881
Subject:
fatty liver, prospective studies, dose response, retrospective studies, meta-analysis, models, risk factors, confidence interval, obesity, body mass index
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: The association between obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has not been fully quantified, and the magnitude of NAFLD risk associated with obesity is still unclear. A meta‐analysis of cohort studies was performed to elucidate the NAFLD risk associated with obesity. METHODS: Pubmed, Web of Science and Embase were searched for cohort studies assessing NAFLD risk associated with obesity or increased body mass index (BMI). Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were pooled using random‐effects model of meta‐analysis. RESULTS: Twenty‐one cohort studies including 13 prospective studies and 8 retrospective studies were finally included. There were a total of 381,655 participants in the meta‐analysis. Compared with normal weight, obesity independently led to a 3.5‐fold increased risk of developing NAFLD (RR = 3.53, 95%CI 2.48 to 5.03, P < 0.001). Meta‐analysis also suggested an obvious dose‐dependent relationship between BMI and NAFLD risk (per 1‐unit increment in BMI: RR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.14 to 1.26, P < 0.001). Subgroup analyses further identified the robustness of the association above. No obvious risk of publication bias was observed. CONCLUSION: Obese individuals have a 3.5‐fold increased risk of developing NAFLD, and there is an obvious dose‐dependent relationship between BMI and NAFLD risk. © 2016 World Obesity
Agid:
5196439