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Acaricidal and Insecticidal Activities of Essential Oils against a Stored-Food Mite and Stored-Grain Insects

Author:
Song, Ja-Eun, Kim, Jeong-Moon, Lee, Na-Hyun, Yang, Ji-Yeon, Lee, Hoi-Seon
Source:
Journal of food protection 2016 v.79 no.1 pp. 174-178
ISSN:
0362-028X
Subject:
Achillea millefolium, Anethum graveolens, Artemisia vulgaris, Citrus aurantium, Eucalyptus dives, Leptospermum, Melaleuca leucadendra, Sitophilus oryzae, Sitophilus zeamais, Sitotroga cerealella, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, acaricidal properties, adults, benzyl benzoate, bioassays, essential oils, exposure duration, fumigants, insecticidal properties, lethal dose 50, mortality, plant fats and oils, storage insects, storage mites
Abstract:
Twenty plant-derived oils were evaluated for their acaricidal and insecticidal activities against Sitotroga cerealella, Sitophilus oryzae, Sitophilus zeamais, and Tyrophagus putrescentiae adults, by using the fumigant and filter paper diffusion methods. Responses varied with bioassay systems, insect or mite species, plant oils, and exposure time. Based on the 50% lethal dose (LD50) values against S. oryzae and S. zeamais in the fumigant bioassay, Anethum graveolens oil (4.12 and 1.12 μg/cm3, respectively) induced the highest mortality, followed by Achillea millefolium (21.92 and 14.91 μg/cm3) and Eucalyptus dives (28.02 and 24.02 μg/cm3) oils, respectively. The most toxic oil based on the 50% lethal concentration values against T. putrescentiae was E. dives (3.13 μg/cm3), followed by Melaleuca leucadendron (3.93 μg/cm3) and Leptospermum pertersonii (4.41 μg/cm3). Neroli birgard oil (1.70 μg/cm3) was the most toxic based on the LD50 values against S. cerealella, followed by Citrus aurantium (1.80 μg/cm3) and Artemisia vulgaris (1.81 μg/cm3). The insecticidal and acaricidal activities of the plant oils in the filter paper diffusion bioassay were similar to those in the fumigant bioassay. In comparison, A. millefolium, A. graveolens, and E. dives oils were more effective against S. oryzae and S. zeamais in the fumigant bioassay than in the contact bioassay. These results indicate that the insecticidal activity of the three plant oils against S. oryzae and S. zeamais may be due to their fumigant action. Acaricidal activities of the A. millefolium, A. graveolens, and E. dives oils against T. putrescentiae were 2.62, 1.11, and 122 times higher than that of benzyl benzoate in the contact bioassay. These results indicate that A. millefolium, A. graveolens, and E. dives oils have potential for development as agents to control stored-grain insects and mites.
Agid:
5233367