PubAg

Main content area

Antioxidant properties of coriander essential oil and linalool and their potential to control Campylobacter spp.

Author:
Duarte, Andreia, Luís, Ângelo, Oleastro, Mónica, Domingues, Fernanda C.
Source:
Food control 2016 v.61 pp. 115-122
ISSN:
0956-7135
Subject:
Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni, Coriandrum sativum, European Union, additives, anti-infective properties, antioxidant activity, antioxidants, biofilm, campylobacteriosis, essential oils, food contamination, food industry, food pathogens, food spoilage, foodborne illness, foods, linalool, lipid peroxidation, oxidation, preservatives, quorum sensing, shelf life, spoilage, zoonoses
Abstract:
Foodborne diseases remain common around the world with Campylobacteriosis being the most commonly reported zoonosis in the European Union in 2013. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the main species associated with human illness. Furthermore, Campylobacter can develop biofilms which is becoming a major problem within the food industry. In addition to foodborne pathogens, oxidation is a non-microbial cause of deterioration of food causing loss of quality and safety. Thus, there is an urgent need in the food industry for new and effective strategies that can help prevent food contamination, spoilage and consequently, foodborne illnesses. Essential oils are known for their antimicrobial and antioxidant properties and are already widely used in the food industry. So, the aim of this work was to study the antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity of coriander essential oil and its major compound linalool against C. jejuni and C. coli strains, as well as their effect in the quorum sensing (QS) system and their potential as antioxidants. Our results, demonstrated that both compounds have anti-Campylobacter activity, inhibited in vitro biofilm formation and promoted biofilm dispersion even at sub-MIC concentrations and interfered with the QS system through the inhibition of violacein production. Moreover, the essential oil and linalool were shown to have radical scavenging properties and lipid peroxidation inhibition ability which could make them potential alternatives to synthetic antioxidants. In sum, our results demonstrated the antibacterial, anti-biofilm, anti-QS and antioxidant potentials of the coriander essential oil and its major compound, linalool, suggesting that they could be used in the food industry to enhance shelf life of food products and increase food safety without requiring chemical additives or preservatives.
Agid:
5266035