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Prevalence of Giardia duodenalis assemblages in weaned cattle on cow-calf operations in the United States

Author:
Santin, Monica, Dargatz, David, Fayer, Ronald
Source:
Veterinary parasitology 2012 v.183 no.3-4 pp. 231
ISSN:
0304-4017
Subject:
DNA, Giardia lamblia, beef cattle, calves, cleaning, cow-calf operations, disease prevalence, feces, genes, herds, humans, mixed infection, polymerase chain reaction, ribosomal RNA, risk, sequence analysis, United States
Abstract:
To determine the prevalence of Giardia duodenalis in weaned beef calves on cow-calf operations in the United States, fecal specimens were collected from 819 calves (6–18 months of age) from 49 operations. After cleaning and concentration procedures to maximize recovery of cysts from feces, DNA was extracted from each of the 819 specimens. The presence of G. duodenalis was determined by nested PCR of a fragment of the SSU rRNA gene. All positive PCR products were subjected to sequence analysis. The overall sample level prevalence of Giardia was 33.5% with prevalence ranging from 0 to 100% among operations. The highest within herd prevalence of infected beef calves was found in one cow-calf operation from the South region (100%), followed by a cow-calf operation from the West region (90%), and three cow-calf operations from the Midwest region (87.5, 85, and 85%). Giardia was not detected in samples from 7 operations including 5 cow-calf operations from the South region, and 1 cow-calf operation each from the Midwest and West regions. Molecular analysis of the Giardia-positive samples identified assemblage E (or E-like) in 31.7% of all samples (260/819) and assemblage A in 1.2% (10/819). A mixed infection with assemblages A and E was observed in four calves from an operation in Midwest region. The potentially zoonotic assemblage A was detected in specimens from four operations in Midwest region. These findings indicate that most G. duodenalis found in weaned beef calves was assemblage E which represents no known zoonotic threat. However, the presence of assemblage A in a small number of animals poses a potential risk of infection to humans.
Agid:
54453
Handle:
10113/54453