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Tuning the Binding Affinities and Reversion Kinetics of a Light Inducible Dimer Allows Control of Transmembrane Protein Localization

Author:
Zimmerman, Seth P., Hallett, Ryan A., Bourke, Ashley M., Bear, James E., Kennedy, Matthew J., Kuhlman, Brian
Source:
Biochemistry 2016 v.55 no.37 pp. 5264-5271
ISSN:
1520-4995
Subject:
binding capacity, blue light, dissociation, half life, neurons, point mutation, transmembrane proteins
Abstract:
Inducible dimers are powerful tools for controlling biological processes through colocalizing signaling molecules. To be effective, an inducible system should have a dissociation constant in the “off” state that is greater (i.e., weaker affinity) than the concentrations of the molecules that are being controlled, and in the “on” state a dissociation constant that is less (i.e., stronger affinity) than the relevant protein concentrations. Here, we reengineer the interaction between the light inducible dimer, iLID, and its binding partner SspB, to better control proteins present at high effective concentrations (5–100 μM). iLID contains a light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domain that undergoes a conformational change upon activation with blue light and exposes a peptide motif, ssrA, that binds to SspB. The new variant of the dimer system contains a single SspB point mutation (A58V), and displays a 42-fold change in binding affinity when activated with blue light (from 3 ± 2 μM to 125 ± 40 μM) and allows for light-activated colocalization of transmembrane proteins in neurons, where a higher affinity switch (0.8–47 μM) was less effective because more colocalization was seen in the dark. Additionally, with a point mutation in the LOV domain (N414L), we lengthened the reversion half-life of iLID. This expanded suite of light induced dimers increases the variety of cellular pathways that can be targeted with light.
Agid:
5509701