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Non-human primate antibody response to mosquito salivary proteins: Implications for dengue virus transmission in Puerto Rico

Author:
Hemme, Ryan R., Poole-Smith, B. Katherine, Hunsperger, Elizabeth A., Felix, Gilberto E., Horiuchi, Kalanthe, Biggerstaff, Brad J., Lopez-Ortiz, Ricardo, Barrera, Roberto
Source:
Acta tropica 2016 v.164 pp. 369-374
ISSN:
0001-706X
Subject:
Aedes aegypti, Aedes taeniorhynchus, Culex quinquefasciatus, Dengue virus, Erythrocebus, Macaca mulatta, antibodies, blood meal, blood serum, dengue, direct contact, hosts, humans, immunologic techniques, insect vectors, monkeys, pathogens, proteins, virus transmission, Puerto Rico
Abstract:
An important step to incriminate a mosquito as a vector of a disease pathogen is finding evidence of direct contact between the mosquito and humans. Typically, this is accomplished through landing/biting catches, or host blood meal analysis in engorged mosquitoes via immunologic assays. An alternate approach is to identify the presence of specific mosquito anti-saliva protein antibodies in the blood of exposed hosts. Following the discovery of dengue infected, free roaming non-human primates in Puerto Rico, we investigated which mosquito species had bitten these primates using a serologic assay. Serum samples from 20 patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) and two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were used to evaluate mosquito bite exposure to Aedes aegypti, Aedes mediovittatus, Aedes taeniorhynchus, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. Of 22 non-human primates examined 20 (90%), 17 (77%), 13 (59%), and 7 (31%) were positive for exposure to Ae. mediovittatus, Cx. quinquefasciatus, Ae. taeniorhynchus, and Ae. aegypti, respectively. Our findings indicated that free-roaming primates in Puerto Rico were exposed to the bites of one proven dengue vector, Ae. aegypti and one potential dengue vector, Ae. mediovittatus.
Agid:
5563123