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Emission of volatile organic compounds and production of secondary organic aerosol from stir-frying spices

Author:
Liu, Tengyu, Liu, Qianyun, Li, Zijun, Huo, Lei, Chan, ManNin, Li, Xue, Zhou, Zhen, Chan, Chak K.
Source:
The Science of the total environment 2017 v.599-600 pp. 1614-1621
ISSN:
0048-9697
Subject:
Myrcia, Zanthoxylum piperitum, aerosols, aldehydes, corn oil, emissions, garlic, ginger, monoterpenoids, ozone, pepper, spectrometers, stir frying, volatile organic compounds, China
Abstract:
Cooking is an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and a potential source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) both indoors and outdoors. In this study, VOC emissions from heating corn oil and stir-frying spices (i.e. garlic, ginger, myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum (Sichuan pepper)) were characterized using an on-line membrane inlet vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-SPI-TOFMS). VOC emissions from heating corn oil were dominated by aldehydes, which were enhanced by factors of one order of magnitude when stir-frying spices. Stir-frying any of the spices studied generated large amounts of methylpyrrole (m/z 81). In addition, stir-frying garlic produced abundant dihydrohydroxymaltol (m/z 144) and diallyldisulfide (DADS) (m/z 146), while stir-frying ginger, myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum produced abundant monoterpenes (m/z 136) and terpenoids (m/z 152, 154). SOA formed from emissions of stir-frying spices through reactions with excess ozone in a flow reactor as well as primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions were characterized using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS). Stir-frying garlic and ginger generated similar POA concentrations to those from heating corn oil while stir-frying myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum generated double the amount of emissions. No SOA was observed from stir-frying garlic and ginger. The rates of SOA production from stir-frying myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum were 1.8μgmin⁻¹gspice⁻¹ and 8.7μgmin⁻¹gspice⁻¹, equivalent to 13.4% and 53.1% of their own POA emission rates, respectively. Therefore, the contribution of stir-frying spices to ambient organic aerosol levels is likely dominated by POA. The rates of total terpene emission from stir-frying myrcia and zanthoxylum piperitum were estimated to be 5.1μgmin⁻¹gspice⁻¹ and 24.9μgmin⁻¹gspice⁻¹, respectively. Our results suggest that stir-frying spices could be an important source of terpenes in indoor environments in Hong Kong, at least during cooking.
Agid:
5690542