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Clinical characteristics of doxorubicin‐associated alopecia in 28 dogs

Author:
Falk, Elizabeth F., Lam, Andrea T. H., Barber, Lisa G., Ferrer, Lluis
Source:
Veterinary dermatology 2017 v.28 no.2 pp. 207
ISSN:
0959-4493
Subject:
doxorubicin, risk, humans, hospitals, dogs, patients, clinical examination, alopecia
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy‐induced alopecia (CIA) is common in humans, but there are limited reports describing the clinical features of CIA in dogs. OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of doxorubicin‐associated alopecia (DAA) in canine patients at a teaching hospital from 2012 to 2014. ANIMALS: Signalment, diagnosis, treatment protocols and clinical examination findings were recorded in 150 dogs treated with doxorubicin from 2012 to 2014. METHODS: Medical records were searched retrospectively for the keywords “alopecia” and “hypotrichosis.” Dogs were excluded if the causal link of hair loss was unclear. RESULTS: Doxorubicin‐associated alopecia was reported in 28 of 150 dogs (19%). Two parameters were statistically associated with the development of DAA: coat‐type and cumulative doxorubicin dose. Dogs with curly or wire‐haired coat‐type were significantly more likely to develop DAA than dogs with straight‐haired coat‐type [χ² (1, N = 147) = 30, P < 0.0001]. After adjusting for sex, weight and doxorubicin dose, the odds of dogs with curly or wire‐haired coat‐type developing DAA were 22 times higher than those with straight‐haired coat‐type (P < 0.0001). Dogs that developed DAA received a significantly higher median cumulative doxorubicin dose (103.0 versus 84.5 mg/m²; P = 0.0039) than those that did not develop DAA. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Dogs treated with doxorubicin may be at risk for developing DAA. This risk increases as the cumulative dose of doxorubicin increases, and with a curly or wire‐haired coat‐type.
Agid:
5721635