PubAg

Main content area

Inputs and Internal Cycling of Nitrogen to a Causeway Influenced, Hypersaline Lake, Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

Author:
Naftz, D.
Source:
Aquatic geochemistry 2017 v.23 no.3 pp. 199-216
ISSN:
1380-6165
Subject:
atmospheric deposition, biogeochemical cycles, culverts, lakes, nitrogen, railroads, surface water, total dissolved nitrogen, Great Salt Lake, Utah
Abstract:
Nitrogen inputs to Great Salt Lake (GSL), located in the western USA, were quantified relative to the resident nitrogen mass in order to better determine numeric nutrient criteria that may be considered at some point in the future. Total dissolved nitrogen inputs from four surface-water sources entering GSL were modeled during the 5-year study period (2010–2014) and ranged from 1.90 × 10⁶ to 5.56 × 10⁶ kg/year. The railroad causeway breach was a significant conduit for the export of dissolved nitrogen from Gilbert to Gunnison Bay, and in 2011 and 2012, net losses of total nitrogen mass from Gilbert Bay via the Causeway breach were 9.59 × 10⁵ and 1.51 × 10⁶ kg. Atmospheric deposition (wet + dry) was a significant source of nitrogen to Gilbert Bay, exceeding the dissolved nitrogen load contributed via the Farmington Bay causeway surface-water input by >100,000 kg during 2 years of the study. Closure of two railroad causeway culverts in 2012 and 2013 likely initiated a decreasing trend in the volume of the higher density Deep Brine Layer and associated declines in total dissolved nitrogen mass contained in this layer. The large dissolved nitrogen pool in Gilbert Bay relative to the amount of nitrogen contributed by surface-water inflow sources is consistent with the terminal nature of GSL and the predominance of internal nutrient cycling. The opening of the new railroad causeway breach in 2016 will likely facilitate more efficient bidirectional flow between Gilbert and Gunnison Bays, resulting in potentially substantial changes in nutrient pools within GSL.
Agid:
5747730