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Chewing gum decreases energy intake at lunch following a controlled breakfast

Author:
Melanson, Kathleen J., Kresge, Daniel L.
Source:
Appetite 2017
ISSN:
0195-6663
Subject:
body mass index, breakfast, chewing gum, cross-over studies, emotions, energy intake, fasting, females, hunger, lunch, males, mastication, pasta, resting energy expenditure
Abstract:
The impact of chewing gum on fasting appetite or meal intake has not been studied. We tested the hypothesis that chewing gum would decrease lunch intake after a controlled breakfast, and reduce hunger in fasting and fed states. Seventeen males and sixteen females (21.4 ± 6.3y, BMI 23.8 ± 2.7 kg/m2) participated in a randomized crossover study in which subjects chewed sugar-free gum a total of one hour on the test day (GC), and did not chew gum on a control day (NG). The 1 h of gum chewing included 20 min while fasting, and two 20-min sessions between breakfast and lunch. Subjects rated their appetite and mood on visual analog scales. After completing the fasting measures, subjects consumed a breakfast shake containing 30% of their measured resting energy expenditure. Three hours later they consumed an ad libitum lunch with water. Fasting ratings of hunger were lower in GC than NG (t = 2.66, p = 0.01). Subjects consumed significantly less pasta (41 g, 68 kcals, t = 2.32, p = 0.03) during GC than NG. In conclusion, gum chewing decreased fasting hunger ratings and lunch energy consumed. Chewing gum may be a useful tool impacting energy balance in this population. Longer studies, especially in other populations, will be required.
Agid:
5761346