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Synergistic effects of dietary vitamin E and selenomethionine on growth performance and tissue methylmercury accumulation on mercury‐induced toxicity in juvenile olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus (Temminck et Schlegel)

Author:
Moniruzzaman, Mohammad, Park, Gunhyun, Yun, Hyeonho, Lee, Seunghan, Park, Youngjin, Bai, Sungchul C
Source:
Aquaculture research 2017 v.48 no.2 pp. 570-580
ISSN:
1355-557X
Subject:
Paralichthys olivaceus, acetates, alpha-tocopherol, antioxidants, bioaccumulation, dose response, experimental diets, feed conversion, flounder, growth performance, juveniles, kidneys, liver, mercury, methylmercury compounds, muscles, protein efficiency ratio, selenium, selenomethionine, specific growth rate, synergism, toxicity, weight gain
Abstract:
An 8‐week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the synergistic effects of dietary vitamin E and selenomethionine (SeMet) on induced methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity in juvenile olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. Nine semi‐purified diets were formulated to contain three different vitamin E levels as DL‐α‐tocopheryl acetate (0, 100 and 200 mg TAkg⁻¹ diet) and three different selenium (Se) levels (0, 2 and 4 SeMet mg kg⁻¹ diet) on the constant mercury toxicity level (20 mg MeHgkg⁻¹ diet). Nine experimental diets, in a 3² factorial design (E₀Se₀, E₀Se₂, E₀Se₄, E₁₀₀Se₀, E₁₀₀Se₂, E₁₀₀Se₄, E₂₀₀Se₀, E₂₀₀Se₂ and E₂₀₀Se₄), were fed to triplicate groups of fish averaging 2.3 ± 0.04 g (mean ± SD) in the semi‐recirculation system. After 8 weeks of feeding trial, vitamin E and Se showed significant effects on weight gain (WG) of fish (P < 0.05). We found that there was a clear trend of increasing WG with elevating vitamin E and Se levels in the diets. Feed efficiency (FE), specific growth rate (SGR), protein efficiency ratio (PER) and survivability exhibited a similar trend with WG. Both antioxidants had significant interaction effects on FE and PER (P < 0.05). Methylmercury concentrations in fish muscle, liver and kidney decreases in a dose‐dependent manner as dietary vitamin E and Se levels increase. Interestingly, the most significant interactive effects of vitamin E and Se were found in liver tissue for depleting Hg concentrations (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that dietary vitamin E more than 100 mg TA kg⁻¹ diet with 2 or 4 mg SeMet kg⁻¹‐supplemented diets could have synergistic effects on growth and liver mercury bioaccumulation on MeHg‐induced toxicity in juvenile olive flounder.
Agid:
5878448