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Effects of different growth temperatures on growth, development, and plastid pigments metabolism of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants

Author:
Yang, Li Yun, Yang, Shuang Long, Li, Jun Ying, Ma, Jun Hong, Pang, Tao, Zou, Cong Ming, He, Bin, Gong, Ming
Source:
Botanical studies 2018 v.59 no.1 pp. 5
ISSN:
1999-3110
Subject:
Nicotiana tabacum, carotenoids, cash crops, chlorophyll, chlorophyllase, flowering, glutamyl-tRNA reductase, hydrogen peroxide, leaves, long term effects, magnesium chelatase, malondialdehyde, metabolism, phytoene synthase, pigments, superoxide anion, temperature, tobacco
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Temperature remarkably affects the growth and metabolism of plants. Tobacco is an important cash crop, and the long-term effects of different growth temperatures (18.5, 23.5 and 28.5 °C, daily average) on growth, development and plastid pigments metabolism of tobacco plants were investigated in this study. RESULTS: Compared with tobacco plants grown under 23.5 °C, treatments with 18.5 and 28.5 °C inhibited the expansion of leaves. The contents of superoxide anion (O ₂·⁻), hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and malonaldehyde (MDA) in the leaves were significantly increased under 28.5 °C from 0 to 60 days, which in turn accelerated the flowering and senescence of tobacco plants. By contrast, the treatment with 18.5 °C remarkably decreased O ₂.⁻ , H₂O₂ and MDA, and delayed the flowering and senescence. Furthermore, treatment with 18.5 °C significantly up-regulated the expression of glutamyl-tRNA reductase (Glu-TR) and magnesium chelatase (MgCH), and down-regulated the ferri chelatase (FeCH), protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase, chlorophyllase (CHLase), phaeophorbide a monooxygenase (PaO) and phytoene synthase (PSY), which further promoted the accumulation of chlorophyll (Chls) and reduced the carotenoids (Cars) in leaves. On the contrary, exposing to 28.5 °C remarkably down-regulated the Glu-TR and MgCH, and up-regulated the FeCH, CHLase, PaO and PSY, which in turn decreased the Chls and increased the Cars in tobacco leaves. CONCLUSION: As compared with the plants grown under 23.5 °C, lower (18.5 °C) and higher (28.5 °C) growth temperature inhibited the growth of tobacco plants. In general, treatment with 28.5 °C accelerated the flowering and senescence of tobacco plants by enhancing the accumulation of O ₂.⁻ and H₂O₂ in leaves, while exposing to 18.5 °C had the opposite effects. Treatment with 18.5 °C increased the content of Chls and reduced the Cars in leaves. In contrast, Treatment with 28.5 °C decreased the Chls and increased the Cars. Moreover, both O ₂.⁻ and H₂O₂ took part in the breakdown of Chls in tobacco leaves to some extent. The results suggest that growth temperature could regulate growth, development, and plastid pigments metabolism, and 23.5 °C could be an optimal temperature for growth, development and metabolism of plastid pigments of tobacco plants under the experimental conditions.
Agid:
5904169