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Effects of chestnut tannins on intestinal morphology, barrier function, pro‐inflammatory cytokine expression, microflora and antioxidant capacity in heat‐stressed broilers

Author:
Liu, H. W., Li, K., Zhao, J. S., Deng, W.
Source:
Journal of animal physiology and animal nutrition 2018 v.102 no.3 pp. 717-726
ISSN:
0931-2439
Subject:
Castanea, Clostridium, Escherichia coli, antioxidant activity, average daily gain, blood serum, cecum, diamine oxidase, diet, enzyme activity, gene expression, growth performance, heat, heat stress, interleukin-6, jejunum, lactic acid, males, malondialdehyde, messenger RNA, microorganisms, superoxide dismutase, tannins, transcription factor NF-kappa B, villi
Abstract:
A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of chestnut tannins (CT) on intestinal morphology, barrier function, pro‐inflammatory cytokine expression, microflora and antioxidant capacity in heat‐stressed broilers. Four hundred 28‐day‐old male Ross 308 broilers were randomly assigned into four groups, with 10 replicates per group and 10 broilers per replicate. The broilers in the normal (NOR) group were kept at 22 ± 1°C and fed the basal diet, and each of the other three groups were treated with cyclic heat (33 ± 1°C from 0800 to 1800 and 22 ± 1°C from 1800 to 0800) and fed the basal diet with 0 (HT), 1 (CT1) or 2 (CT2) g of CT/kg of diet. The experiment lasted for 14 days. Compared with the HT group, broilers in the NOR and CT2 groups had higher (p < .05) average daily gain and villus height in the jejunum and lower serum d‐lactate (p < .001) and diamine oxidase (p < .01) levels. The addition of 2 g CT/kg of diet increased the total antioxidant capacity (p < .001) and superoxide dismutase activities (p < .05) and zonula occludens‐1 mRNA expression level (p < .05) and decreased the malondialdehyde concentration (p < .01) and mRNA expression levels of interleukin‐6 (p < .001) and nuclear factor kappa B (p < .001) in the jejunal mucosa of heat‐stressed broilers. The populations of Escherichia coli and Clostridium in the jejunum (p < .01) and caecum (p < .05) of broilers in the HT group were higher than those in the NOR and CT2 groups. In conclusion, the addition of 2 g CT/kg of diet seemed to be a feasible means of alleviating the negative effects of heat stress on the growth performance and intestinal function of broilers.
Agid:
5939337