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Cherry (Prunus avium) phenolic compounds for antioxidant preservation at food interfaces

Author:
Basanta, Maria F., Rojas, Ana M., Martinefski, Manuela R., Tripodi, Valeria P., De’Nobili, Maria D., Fissore, Eliana N.
Source:
Journal of food engineering 2018 v.239 pp. 15-25
ISSN:
0260-8774
Subject:
Lewis bases, Prunus avium, anthocyanins, antioxidant activity, color, coumaric acids, diffusivity, flavonols, pH, relative humidity, singlet oxygen, water content
Abstract:
Cherry phenolics extracted by 90°C-water were loaded in a low-methoxyl-pectin (LMP) film for antioxidant preservation. Dark red films (pH = 3.46) contained flavonols (dihydrokaempferol-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-rutinoside), hydroxycinnamic acids (neochlorogenic, chlorogenic, 3-p-coumaroylquinic acids), and anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside), with a 6.97 × 10−12 m2/s diffusion coefficient. Phenolics’ stability was studied at constant relative humidity (RH: 57.7; 75.2%) and 25.0 °C. The pseudo-first-order de gradation rate was the highest (t1/2 = 3-2 months) and increased with the equilibration RH in darkness for anthocyanins, with simultaneous red vanishing by water nucleophilic attack. Instead, flavonols remained stable (t1/2 >1.5 years). Light (75.2%RH) induced the highest phenolics-degradation-rates, especially for anthocyanins (t1/2 = 11d), sensitizer, and film red color. Flavonols-decay was the slowest (t1/2 = 7–12 months). Antioxidant capacity paralleled phenolics-content. Hydroxycinnamic acids followed by flavonols could scavenge the singlet oxygen. Light-triggered LMP-matrix―phenolic interactions were determined, producing the lowest film water content and deformability. Cherry phenolics stabilized as a colored film constituted a food preserving antioxidant barrier.
Agid:
6018871