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Emerging technologies for non-invasive quantification of physiological oxygen transport in plants

Author:
Chaturvedi, P., Taguchi, M., Burrs, S. L., Hauser, B. A., Salim, W. W. A. W., Claussen, J. C., McLamore, E. S.
Source:
Planta 2013 v.238 no.3 pp. 599-614
ISSN:
0032-0935
Subject:
antioxidants, biochemical pathways, byproducts, enzymes, metabolism, oxygen, physiologists, plant adaptation, reactive oxygen species, soil, stress response
Abstract:
Oxygen plays a critical role in plant metabolism, stress response/signaling, and adaptation to environmental changes (Lambers and Colmer, Plant Soil 274:7–15, 2005; Pitzschke et al., Antioxid Redox Signal 8:1757–1764, 2006; Van Breusegem et al., Plant Sci 161:405–414, 2001). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), by-products of various metabolic pathways in which oxygen is a key molecule, are produced during adaptation responses to environmental stress. While much is known about plant adaptation to stress (e.g., detoxifying enzymes, antioxidant production), the link between ROS metabolism, O₂ transport, and stress response mechanisms is unknown. Thus, non-invasive technologies for measuring O₂ are critical for understanding the link between physiological O₂ transport and ROS signaling. New non-invasive technologies allow real-time measurement of O₂ at the single cell and even organelle levels. This review briefly summarizes currently available (i.e., mainstream) technologies for measuring O₂ and then introduces emerging technologies for measuring O₂. Advanced techniques that provide the ability to non-invasively (i.e., non-destructively) measure O₂ are highlighted. In the near future, these non-invasive sensors will facilitate novel experimentation that will allow plant physiologists to ask new hypothesis-driven research questions aimed at improving our understanding of physiological O₂ transport.
Agid:
605012