U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Https

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

PubAg

Main content area

Effect of Lactococcus lactis K-C2 on the growth performance, amino acid content and gut microflora of amberjack Seriola dumerili

Author:
Nguyen Thi Hue Linh, Setsuko Nagai, Noriko Nagasaka, Seika Okane, Yousuke Taoka
Source:
Fisheries science 2018 v.84 no.6 pp. 1051-1062
ISSN:
0919-9268
Subject:
Acidobacteria, Acinetobacter, Kocuria, Lactococcus lactis, Mycobacterium, Propionibacterium, Seriola dumerili, Sphingomonas, Staphylococcus, alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, diet, feed intake, fish, free amino acids, growth performance, intestinal microorganisms, intestines, nutritive value, probiotics, sarcosines, taurine
Abstract:
This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Lactococcus lactis K-C2 on the growth performance, microbial diversity, and release of free amino acids in the intestinal tract and the edible parts of young amberjack, Seriola dumerili. Fish were fed a diet with or without strain K-C2 (2 × 10¹⁰ cfu/g feed) for 25 days. The results indicated that the growth performance of fish in the treated group was significantly higher than those in the control group (p < 0.05). The amount of five amino acids (aspartate, sarcosine, taurine, alanine, and arginine) in the gut content and 13 of 21 amino acids in the edible parts of fish in the treated group were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those in the control group. Sphingomonas, Propionibacterium, and Mycobacterium were observed in gut microflora of fish in both the control and treated groups. Staphylococcus and Kocuria were detected in one sample from the control and treated groups; Acinetobacter and Acidobacteria were found in one sample from the control group. L. lactis was only found in one sample in the treated group. In conclusion, the dietary administration of probiotic L. lactis stimulated growth, reduced feed consumption, and improved the nutritional value of cultured amberjack.
Agid:
6152630