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Diazinon and Permethrin Mitigation Across a Grass–Wetland Buffer

Author:
Moore, M. T., Kröger, R., Locke, M. A., Lizotte, R. E., Jr., Testa, S., III, Cooper, C. M.
Source:
Bulletin of environmental contamination and toxicology 2014 v.93 no.5 pp. 574-579
ISSN:
0007-4861
Subject:
agricultural runoff, botanical composition, diazinon, isomers, permethrin, pesticidal properties, pesticide residues, pollution control, stormwater, vegetation, wetland buffers
Abstract:
Vegetated buffers of different designs are often used as edge-of-field treatment practices to remove pesticides that may be entrained in agricultural runoff. However, buffer system efficacy in pesticide runoff mitigation varies widely due to a multitude of factors including, but not limited to, pesticide chemistry, vegetation composition, and hydrology. Two experimental systems, a control (no vegetation) and a grass–wetland buffer system, were evaluated for their ability to retain diazinon and permethrin associated with a simulated storm runoff. The two systems were equally inefficient at retaining diazinon (mean 9.6 % retention for control and buffer). Grass–wetland buffers retained 83 % and 85 % of cis- and trans-permethrin masses, respectively, while the control only retained 39 % and 44 % of cis- and trans-permethrin masses, respectively. Half-distances (the distance required to decrease pesticide concentration by one-half) for both permethrin isomers were 26 %–30 % shorter in grass buffers (22–23 m) than in the control (32 m). The current study demonstrates treatment efficacy was a function of pesticide properties with the more strongly sorbing permethrin retained to a greater degree. The study also demonstrates challenges in remediating multiple pesticides with a single management practice. By using suites of management practices, especially those employing vegetation, better mitigation of pesticide impacts may be accomplished.
Handle:
10113/62056