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Inactivation of biofilm cells of foodborne pathogens by steam pasteurization

Author:
Park, Sang-Hyun, Kang, Dong-Hyun
Source:
European food research & technology 2014 v.238 no.3 pp. 471-476
ISSN:
1438-2377
Subject:
stainless steel, biofilm, poly(vinyl chloride), Salmonella Typhimurium, steam, food industry, food pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157, steam pasteurization
Abstract:
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of steam pasteurization on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes biofilms on stainless steel and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Biofilms were formed on a stainless steel and PVC coupon by using a mixture of three strains each of three foodborne pathogens. Six-day-old biofilms on stainless steel and PVC coupons were treated with steam at 75 and 85 °C for 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 s. Biofilm cells of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on stainless steel were reduced by more than 6 log CFU/coupon after exposure to steam at 75 °C for 30, 40, and 30 s, respectively, and at 85 °C for 30, 20, and 20 s, respectively. Steam treatment resulted in less reduction in the levels of biofilm cells on PVC coupons. Biofilm cells of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes were reduced by 1.78, 2.04, and 1.29 log CFU/coupon, respectively, after 50 s of exposure to steam at 75 °C. Exposure to steam at 85° for 50 s reduced biofilm cells of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes by 2.53, 3.01, and 1.70 log CFU/coupon, respectively. The results of this study suggest that steam pasteurization has potential as a biofilm control method by the food industry.
Agid:
622757