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The salivary secretome of the biting midge, Culicoides sonorensis

Author:
Lehiy, Christopher I., Drolet, Barbara S.
Source:
PeerJ 2014 v.2 pp. e426
ISSN:
2167-8359
Subject:
Culicidae, Culicoides sonorensis, Simuliidae, alpha-glucosidase, arboviruses, binding proteins, blood, bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease, hematophagous insects, insect vectors, midges, odor compounds, pathogenesis, protein secretion, proteinase inhibitors, saliva, trypsin, virus transmission
Abstract:
Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are hematophagous insects with over 1400 species distributed throughout the world. Many of these species are of particular agricultural importance as primary vectors of bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and Schmallenberg viruses. Detailed studies of members from other blood-feeding Dipteran families, including those of mosquito (Culicidae) and black fly (Simuliidae), have shown that protein components within the insect’s saliva facilitate the blood feeding process. To determine the protein components in Culicoides sonorensis midges, secreted saliva was collected and submitted for MS/MS peptide sequencing. Forty-five secreted proteins were identified, including members of the D7 odorant binding protein family, Kunitz-like serine protease inhibitors, maltase, trypsin, and six novel proteins unique to C. sonorensis. Identifying the complex myriad of proteins in saliva from blood-feeding Dipteran species is critical for understanding their role in blood feeding, arbovirus transmission, and possibly pathogenesis.
Agid:
62661
Handle:
10113/62661