PubAg

Main content area

Antibiotic treatment triggers gut dysbiosis and modulates metabolism in a chicken model of gastro-intestinal infection

Author:
Le Roy, Caroline Ivanne, Woodward, Martin John, Ellis, Richard John, La Ragione, Roberto Marcello, Claus, Sandrine Paule
Source:
BMC veterinary research 2019 v.15 no.1 pp. 37
ISSN:
1746-6148
Subject:
Brachyspira pilosicoli, animal production, antibiotics, betaine, biochemical pathways, chickens, death, digestive system, dysbiosis, dysentery, energy metabolism, glucose, glycerol, high density lipoprotein, high-throughput nucleotide sequencing, intestinal microorganisms, models, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, pathogens, phenotype, production technology, ribosomal DNA, signs and symptoms (animals and humans), tiamulin, very low density lipoprotein, weight loss
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Infection of the digestive track by gastro-intestinal pathogens results in the development of symptoms ranging from mild diarrhea to more severe clinical signs such as dysentery, severe dehydration and potentially death. Although, antibiotics are efficient to tackle infections, they also trigger dysbiosis that has been suggested to result in variation in weight gain in animal production systems. RESULTS: Here is the first study demonstrating the metabolic impact of infection by a gastro-intestinal pathogen (Brachyspira pilosicoli) and its resolution by antibiotic treatment (tiamulin) on the host (chicken) systemic metabolism and gut microbiota composition using high-resolution ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and 16S rDNA next generation sequencing (NGS). Clear systemic metabolic markers of infections such as glycerol and betaine were identified. Weight loss in untreated animals was in part explained by the observation of a modification of systemic host energy metabolism characterized by the utilization of glycerol as a glucose precursor. However, antibiotic treatment triggered an increased VLDL/HDL ratio in plasma that may contribute to reducing weight loss observed in treated birds. All metabolic responses co-occurred with significant shift of the microbiota upon infection or antibiotic treatment. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that infection and antibiotic treatment trigger dysbiosis that may impact host systemic energy metabolism and cause phenotypic and health modifications.
Agid:
6278267