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The gut microbiota of soil organisms show species-specific responses to liming

Author:
Ding, Jing, Zhu, Dong, Li, Hu, Ding, Kai, Chen, Qing-Lin, Lassen, Simon Bo, Ke, Xin, O'Connor, Patrick, Zhu, Yong-Guan
Source:
The Science of the total environment 2019 v.659 pp. 715-723
ISSN:
0048-9697
Subject:
Bacillaceae, Enchytraeus, Enterobacteriaceae, Folsomia candida, Moraxellaceae, Rickettsiaceae, biogeochemical cycles, genes, high-throughput nucleotide sequencing, intestinal microorganisms, liming, microbial communities, plant growth, ribosomal RNA, soil acidification, soil fauna, soil microorganisms, soil properties, structural equation modeling
Abstract:
Liming is a common agronomic practice used for alleviating soil acidification to improve plant growth. However, it is still unclear how liming can affect the gut microbiota composition of soil fauna, and subsequently the nutrient cycling and litter decomposition mediated by soil fauna. In the present study the effect of liming on the gut microbiota of two types of soil fauna, Folsomia candida, and Enchytraeus crypticus was investigated by using 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing. The results revealed that there are differences between the gut microbial communities of the two types of soil fauna as well as between the gut microbiome of the soil fauna and the surrounding soil. Enterobacteriaceae and Bacillaceae were the predominant families in the gut microbiota of E. crypticus, while Rickettsiaceae and Moraxellaceae were the predominant families in the gut microbiota of F. candida. Liming affected the gut microbiota of E. crypticus at both the taxonomical and core microbiota level. The gut microbiota of F. candida was not affected by liming. Structural equation models suggest that 97% of the variation in the E. crypticus gut microbiota could be explained by liming-induced changes in soil properties and the soil microbial community. The indirect effects of liming, caused by a shift in the soil microbial community, contributed more in reshaping the gut microbiota of E. crypticus than the direct effects of the changed soil properties did. These findings suggest that the effects of liming on the gut microbiota composition in soil fauna are species-specific and are likely dependent on the response of the host to changes in soil properties and the soil microbial community.
Agid:
6282350