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Removing prophylactic antibiotics from pig feed: how does it affect their performance and health?

Author:
Diana, Alessia, Boyle, Laura A., Leonard, Finola C., Carroll, Ciaran, Sheehan, Eugene, Murphy, Declan, Manzanilla, Edgar G.
Source:
BMC veterinary research 2019 v.15 no.1 pp. 67
ISSN:
1746-6148
Subject:
abscess, animal performance, antibiotic resistance, antibiotics, commercial farms, feed conversion, feed intake, infectious diseases, livestock and meat industry, medicated feeds, mortality, pleuropneumonia, slaughter, slaughterhouses, swine, weaning, weanlings
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Antibiotics (AB) are an important tool to tackle infectious disease in pig farms; however some research indicates that their frequent mis/over-use may contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance and the WHO has declared that this issue should be addressed. Little is known about the long term consequences of withdrawing prophylactic AB from pig feed; hence we aimed to assess its effects on performance and health of pigs from weaning to slaughter. Six batches of 140 pigs each were monitored on a commercial farm through the weaner and finisher stages to slaughter. In-feed antibiotics were not added to the feed for half of the pigs (NOI) and were added in the other half (ABI) within each batch for the whole weaner stage. Individual pigs in both treatments were treated with parenteral administrations if and when detected as ill or lame. Productive performance, parenteral treatments and mortality were recorded on farm and the presence of respiratory disease was recorded at slaughter. Pen was considered the experimental unit. RESULTS: ABI pigs showed higher growth (P = 0.018) and feed intake (P = 0.048) than NOI pigs in the first weaner stage but feed efficiency was not affected (NOI = 1.48 vs. ABI = 1.52). Despite an initial reduction in performance, NOI pigs had similar performance in finisher stage (ADG: NOI = 865.4 vs. ABI = 882.2) and minimal effects on health compared to ABI pigs. No difference between treatments was found at the abattoir for the percentage of pigs affected by pneumonia, pleurisy, pleuropneumonia and abscesses (P > 0.05). Mortality rate was not affected by treatment during the weaner stage (P = 0.806) although it tended to be slightly higher in NOI than ABI pigs during the finisher stage (P = 0.099). Parenteral treatments were more frequent in NOI pigs during the weaner stage (P < 0.001) while no difference was recorded during the finisher stage (P = 0.406). CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the removal of prophylactic in-feed antibiotics is possible with only minor reductions in productive performance and health which can be addressed by improved husbandry and use of parenteral antibiotics.
Agid:
6325798