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Satellite patches, patch expansion, and doubling time as decision metrics for invasion control: Pennisetum ciliare expansion in southwestern Arizona

Author:
Weston, Jaron D., McClaran, Mitchel P., Whittle, Richard K., Black, Christian W., Fehmi, Jeffrey S.
Source:
Invasive plant science and management 2019 v.12 no.1 pp. 36-42
ISSN:
1939-747X
Subject:
C4 plants, Cenchrus ciliaris, grasses, invasive species, monitoring, population distribution, roads, satellites, Africa, Arizona
Abstract:
Essential variables to consider for an efficient control strategy for invasive plants include dispersion pattern (i.e., satellite or invasion front) and patch expansion rate. These variables were demonstrated for buffelgrass [Pennisetum ciliare (L.) Link], a Cā‚„ perennial grass introduced from Africa, which has invaded broadly around the world. The study site was along a roadway in southern Arizona (USA). The P. ciliare plant distributions show the pattern of clumping associated with the satellite (nascent foci) colonization pattern (average nearest neighbor test, z-score ā€“47.2, P < 0.01). The distance between patches ranged from 0.743 to 12.8 km, with an average distance between patches of 5.6 km. Median patch expansion rate was 271% over the 3-yr monitoring period versus 136% found in other studies of established P. ciliare patches. Targeting P. ciliare satellite patches as a control strategy may exponentially reduce the areal doubling time, while targeting the largest patches may have less effect on the invasion speed.
Agid:
6445745