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Dynamic oral administration of uridine affects the diurnal rhythm of bile acid and cholesterol metabolism-related genes in mice

Author:
Zhang, Ke, Liu, Yi-lin, Zhang, Yumei, Zhang, Juan, Deng, Zeyuan, Wu, Xin, Yin, Yulong
Source:
Biological rhythm research 2019 v.50 no.4 pp. 543-552
ISSN:
1744-4179
Subject:
absorption, alanine transaminase, bile acids, blood serum, cholesterol, cholesterol metabolism, circadian rhythm, duodenum, excretion, gene expression, gene expression regulation, genes, ileum, liver, metabolic syndrome, mice, oral administration, uridine
Abstract:
Bile acids and cholesterol metabolism exhibits distinct daily rhythms and uridine closely associated with bile acids has been well documented. However, how dynamic oral administration of uridine affects bile acid and cholesterol metabolism has not been studied. We conducted the present study to investigate effects of oral administration of uridine in the daytime and nighttime (D-UR and N-UR) on bile acid and cholesterol metabolism-related genes expression in liver and ileum of mice. The results showed that oral administration of uridine in the nighttime (N-UR) reduced serum CHOL and ALT levels at Zeitgeber time (ZT) 4, ZT22, respectively. Compared with D-UR group, the mRNA expression of FXR and SHP genes of liver decreased in N-UR group at ZT10, ZT16, respectively. In addition, oral administration of uridine in the nighttime rhythmically increased the mRNA expression of bile acid transport, cholesterol excretion and decreased the mRNA expression of cholesterol absorption in ileum. Moreover, the expression of nucleotide transport and synthesis genes were also explored in duodenum. Oral administration of uridine in the nighttime rhythmically up-regulated nucleotide transport and synthesis genes expression. In conclusion, these results indicated dynamic oral administration of uridine has effects on the rhythmic fluctuation of cholesterol, bile acid and nucleotide metabolism-related genes. These findings have important physiological and pathophysiological implications, since bile acid and cholesterol metabolism are essential for cell function and closely involved in the development of metabolic syndrome.
Agid:
6479566