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Micronutrient Dietary Intake in Latina Pregnant Adolescents and Its Association with Level of Depression, Stress, and Social Support

Author:
Singh, Angelie, Trumpff, Caroline, Genkinger, Jeanine, Davis, Alida, Spann, Marisa, Werner, Elizabeth, Monk, Catherine
Source:
Nutrients 2017 v.9 no.11
ISSN:
2072-6643
Subject:
Estimated Average Requirement, Latinos, adults, ascorbic acid, automation, calcium, children, copper, diet recall, dietary supplements, distress, energy, folic acid, food intake, iron, lipids, magnesium, mental depression, niacin, phosphorus, pregnancy outcome, pregnant adolescents, pregnant women, pyridoxine, questionnaires, riboflavin, risk factors, selenium, social support, thiamin, vitamin A, vitamin B12, vitamin E, zinc
Abstract:
Adolescent pregnant women are at greater risk for nutritional deficits, stress, and depression than their adult counterparts, and these risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes are likely interrelated. This study evaluated the prevalence of nutritional deficits in pregnant teenagers and assessed the associations among micronutrient dietary intake, stress, and depression. One hundred and eight pregnant Latina adolescents completed an Automated Self-Administered 24-hour dietary recall (ASA24) in the 2nd trimester. Stress was measured using the Perceived Stress Scale and the Prenatal Distress Questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were evaluated with the Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale. Social support satisfaction was measured using the Social Support Questionnaire. More than 50% of pregnant teenagers had an inadequate intake (excluding dietary supplement) of folate, vitamin A, vitamin E, iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorous. Additionally, >20% of participants had an inadequate intake of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin C, copper, and selenium. Prenatal supplement inclusion improved dietary intake for most micronutrients except for calcium, magnesium, and phosphorous, (>50% below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR)) and for copper and selenium (>20% below the EAR). Higher depressive symptoms were associated with higher energy, carbohydrates, and fats, and lower magnesium intake. Higher social support satisfaction was positively associated with dietary intake of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin C, vitamin E, iron, and zinc. The findings suggest that mood and dietary factors are associated and should be considered together for health interventions during adolescent pregnancy for the young woman and her future child.
Agid:
6502139