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Caffeinated Gel Ingestion Enhances Jump Performance, Muscle Strength, and Power in Trained Men

Author:
Venier, Sandro, Grgic, Jozo, Mikulic, Pavle
Source:
Nutrients 2019 v.11 no.4
ISSN:
2072-6643
Subject:
caffeine, gels, men, muscle strength, placebos, standard deviation, torque
Abstract:
We aimed to explore the effects of caffeinated gel ingestion on neuromuscular performance in resistance-trained men. The participants (n = 17; mean &plusmn; standard deviation (SD): age 23 &plusmn; 2 years, height 183 &plusmn; 5 cm, body mass 83 &plusmn; 11 kg) completed two testing conditions that involved ingesting a caffeinated gel (300 mg of caffeine) or placebo. The testing outcomes included: (1) vertical jump height in the squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ); (2) knee extension and flexion peak torque and average power at angular velocities of 60&deg;&middot;s&minus;1 and 180&deg;&middot;s&minus;1; (3) barbell velocity in the bench press with loads corresponding to 50%, 75%, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM); and (4) peak power output in a test on a rowing ergometer. Compared to the placebo, caffeine improved: (1) SJ (p = 0.039; Cohen&rsquo;s d effect size (d) = 0.18; +2.9%) and CMJ height (p = 0.011; d = 0.18; +3.3%); (2) peak torque and average power in the knee extensors at both angular velocities (d ranged from 0.21 to 0.37; percent change from +3.5% to +6.9%), peak torque (p = 0.034; d = 0.24; +4.6%), and average power (p = 0.015; d = 0.32; +6.7%) at 60&deg;&middot;s&minus;1 in the knee flexors; (3) barbell velocity at 50% 1RM (p = 0.021; d = 0.33; +3.5%), 75% 1RM (p < 0.001; d = 0.42; +5.4%), and 90% 1RM (p < 0.001; d = 0.59, +12.0%). We conclude that the ingestion of caffeinated gels may acutely improve vertical jump performance, strength, and power in resistance-trained men.
Agid:
6507645