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Effect of microbial inoculation and particle size on fermentation profile, aerobic stability, and ruminal in situ starch degradation of high-moisture corn ensiled for a short period

Author:
Saylor, B.A., Casale, F., Sultana, H., Ferraretto, L.F.
Source:
Journal of dairy science 2020 v.103 no.1 pp. 379-395
ISSN:
0022-0302
Subject:
Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis, acetic acid, ammonium nitrogen, corn, farmers, fermentation, forage, lactic acid, particle size, pouches, silos, starch, storage time
Abstract:
Dairy farmers are often challenged with the need to feed high-moisture corn (HMC) after less than 30 d of fermentation. The objective this study was to assess the effects of microbial inoculation and particle size on fermentation profile, aerobic stability, and ruminal in situ starch degradation of HMC ensiled for a short period. High-moisture corn was harvested, coarsely ground (3,798 ± 40 µm, on average) or finely ground (984 ± 42 µm, on average), then ensiled in quadruplicate vacuum pouches untreated (CON) or with the following treatments: Lactobacillus plantarum CH6072 at 5 × 10⁴ cfu/g and Enterococcus faecium CH212 at 5 × 10⁴ cfu/g of fresh forage (LPEF); or Lactobacillus buchneri LB1819 at 7.5 × 10⁴ cfu/g and Lactococcus lactis O224 at 7.5 × 10⁴ cfu/g (LBLL). Silos were allowed to ferment for 14 or 28 d. Ruminal in situ starch degradation increased when HMC was finely ground. In addition, in situ starch degradation was greater and aerobic stability increased approximately 5-fold with LBLL compared with CON and LPEF. An interaction between microbial inoculation and storage length occurred for lactic acid. At 14 d, concentrations of lactic acid were greatest in LPEF and lowest in LBLL. Lactic acid concentrations increased from 14 to 28 d with CON and LPEF, but decreased with LBLL. At 28 d, concentrations of lactic acid were lower in LBLL compared with CON and LPEF. An interaction between particle size, microbial inoculation, and storage length occurred for acetic acid and ammonia-N. At 14 and 28 d, acetic acid concentrations were greatest in finely ground LBLL followed by coarsely ground LBLL. Ammonia-N concentrations increased across all treatments from 0 to 28 d. At 14 and 28 d, concentrations of ammonia-N were greatest in finely ground LBLL and lowest in coarsely ground CON and coarsely ground LPEF. Results from this study suggest that L. buchneri LB1819 can produce acetic acid in as little as 14 d, and that by 28 d, it has the potential to improve the aerobic stability of HMC. Additionally, results indicate that L. buchneri LB1819 has the potential to improve ruminal degradation of starch by 28 d of storage. Finally, results confirm enhanced fermentation and improved ruminal starch degradation with finely ground HMC by 28 d of storage.
Agid:
6729445