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Tick paralysis in a free-ranging bobcat (Lynx rufus)

Author:
Persky, Meredith E., Jafarey, Yousuf S., Christoff, Sarah E., Maddox, Dewey D., Stowell, Stephanie A., Norton, Terry M.
Source:
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 2020 v.256 no.3 pp. 362-364
ISSN:
0003-1488
Subject:
Amblyomma americanum, Bartonella clarridgeiae, Ixodes scapularis, Lynx rufus, Siphonaptera, Toxoplasma gondii, animal viruses, clinical examination, fipronil, hematologic tests, immunologic techniques, introduced species, males, neuromuscular disorders, paralysis, patients, pelvis, polymerase chain reaction, radiography, tick infestations, ticks, Australia
Abstract:
CASE DESCRIPTION A free-ranging male bobcat (Lynx rufus) was evaluated because of signs of pelvic limb paralysis. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination of the anesthetized animal revealed tick infestation, normal mentation, and a lack of evidence of traumatic injuries. Radiography revealed no clinically relevant abnormalities. Hematologic analysis results were generally unremarkable, and serologic tests for exposure to feline coronavirus, FeLV, FIV, and Toxoplasma gondii were negative. Results of PCR assays for flea- and common tick-borne organisms other than Bartonella clarridgeiae were negative. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Ticks were manually removed, and the patient received supportive care and fipronil treatment. The bobcat made a full recovery within 72 hours after treatment for ticks, and a presumptive diagnosis of tick paralysis was made. Identified tick species included Dermacenter variabilis, Amblyomma americanum, and Ixodes scapularis. CLINICAL RELEVANCE To the authors’ knowledge, tick paralysis has not previously been reported in felids outside Australia. This disease should be considered a differential diagnosis in felids, including exotic cats, with signs of neuromuscular disease of unknown etiopathogenesis.
Agid:
6819454