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Ambient fine particulate matter and hospital admissions for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes and transient ischemic attack in 248 Chinese cities

Author:
Gu, Jiangshao, Shi, Ying, Chen, Ning, Wang, Haibo, Chen, Ting
Source:
The Science of the total environment 2020 v.715 pp. 136896
ISSN:
0048-9697
Subject:
acute effects, acute exposure, air pollutants, air pollution, cities, cold season, hospitals, meta-analysis, models, particulates, risk, stroke, China
Abstract:
Few studies have investigated the acute effects of fine particulate matter (PM₂.₅) on the risk of stroke subtypes and transient ischemic attack (TIA) in low- and middle-income countries. The primary aim of this study was to assess the associations between short-term exposure to PM₂.₅ and daily hospital admissions for total cerebrovascular disease, ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, and TIA in China. A total of 8,359,162 hospital admissions in 248 Chinese cities from 2013 to 2017 were identified from the Hospital Quality Monitoring System of China. Generalized additive models with quasi-Poisson regression were used to estimate the associations in each city, and random-effect meta-analyses were conducted to combine the city-specific estimates. We found that a 10 μg/m³ increase in PM₂.₅ concentration was significantly associated with a 0.19% (95% CI, 0.13% to 0.25%), 0.26% (95% CI, 0.17% to 0.35%), and 0.26% (95% CI, 0.13% to 0.38%) increase in same-day hospital admissions for total cerebrovascular disease, ischemic stroke, and TIA, respectively. In contrast, a non-significant negative association with PM₂.₅ was observed for hemorrhagic stroke in the main analyses (lag 0 day), which became statistically significant when using other single-day exposures (lag 1 or 2 days) or moving average exposures (lag 0–1, 0–2, or 0–3 days) as exposure metric. These associations were robust to adjustment for other criteria air pollutants in two-pollutant models. For ischemic stroke, the effect estimates were significantly larger in people aged 65–74 years, in cool season, and in cities with lower annual average PM₂.₅ concentrations. The exposure-response curves were nonlinear with a leveling off at high concentrations. These results contribute to the relatively limited literature on the PM₂.₅-related risks of cerebrovascular events in low- and middle-income countries.
Agid:
6834849