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Mouthfeel Detection Threshold and Instrumental Viscosity of Sucrose and High Fructose Corn Syrup Solutions

Author:
Kappes, S.M., Schmidt, S.J., Lee, S.Y.
Source:
Journal of food science 2006 v.71 no.9 pp. S597
ISSN:
0022-1147
Subject:
carbonated beverages, soft drinks, mouthfeel, viscosity, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, dietetic foods, sensory evaluation
Abstract:
Significant mouthfeel differences between diet and regular cola carbonated beverages have been reported; however, the underlying cause of those differences is not well understood. One avenue explored here is the connection between mouthfeel differences and mouthfeel thresholds of model solutions containing sweeteners used in regular carbonated beverages. The objectives of this research were to (1) determine individual and group mouthfeel detection thresholds of sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) solutions while suppressing sweet taste; (2) relate individual and group thresholds to viscosity and number of sweetener molecules in solution; and (3) measure and compare the viscosities of commercial carbonated beverages to the viscosities of sucrose and HFCS solutions formulated to the concentrations of individual and group thresholds. The R-index measure by the rating method was used by 21 panelists to evaluate the thickness difference of sucrose and HFCS solutions compared to water using Gymnema sylvestre tea to supress sweet taste. The group mouthfeel detection threshold for sucrose was 16.78% ± 8.72% (g/100 mL) and for HFCS was 11.48% ± 8.67% (g/100 mL). The average viscosity of regular carbonated beverages is within the viscosity range associated with the group mouthfeel threshold concentrations of sucrose and HFCS solutions, but the average viscosity of diet carbonated beverages is lower than the viscosity range associated with the group mouthfeel detection threshold concentrations of sucrose and HFCS solutions. This research implies that consumers are sensitive enough to detect mouthfeel differences between diet and regular carbonated beverages, albeit the instrumental viscosity difference being small (0.527 mPa · s).
Agid:
702424