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A comparison between E-beam irradiation and high pressure treatment for cold-smoked salmon sanitation: microbiological aspects

Author:
Medina, M., Cabeza, M.C., Bravo, D., Cambero, I., Montiel, R., Ordonez, J.A., Nunez, M., Hoz, L.
Source:
Food microbiology 2009 v.26 no.2 pp. 224-227
ISSN:
0740-0020
Subject:
smoked fish, salmon, food preservation, food irradiation, gamma radiation, electrons, high pressure treatment, shelf life, food safety, food sanitation, microbiological quality, Listeria monocytogenes, food storage, storage temperature, cold storage, storage time, food pathogens, bacterial contamination
Abstract:
The effectiveness of electron beam irradiation and high pressure treatment for the sanitation of cold-smoked salmon from two points of view, microbial safety and shelf-life extension, was compared. From the response of L. monocytogenes INIA H66a to irradiation, a D value of 0.51 kGy was calculated. For samples stored at 5 °C, 1.5 kGy would be sufficient to attain a Food Safety Objective (FSO) of 2 log10cfu/g L. monocytogenes for a 35-day shelf-life, whereas 3 kGy would be needed in the case of a temperature abuse (5 °C + 8 °C). Pressurization at 450 MPa for 5 min was considered to be an insufficient treatment, since the FSO of 2 log10cfu/g L. monocytogenes was only attained for a shelf-life of 21 days at 5 °C. However, treatment at 450 MPa for 10 min achieved this FSO for samples held during 35 days at 5 °C, or during 21 days under temperature abuse (5 °C + 8 °C) conditions. Irradiation at 2 kGy kept the microbial population of smoked salmon below 6 log10cfu/g after 35 days at 5 °C, with negligible or very light changes in its odor. Pressurization at 450 MPa for 5 min also kept the microbial population below 6 log10cfu/g after 35 days at 5 °C and did not alter odor, but affected negatively the visual aspect of smoked salmon.
Agid:
754133