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Individual differences in food-cue reactivity. The role of BMI and everyday portion-size selections

Author:
Tetley, Amanda, Brunstrom, Jeffrey, Griffiths, Paula
Source:
Appetite 2009 v.52 no.3 pp. 614-620
ISSN:
0195-6663
Subject:
pizza, portion size, women, dietary restriction, craving, overweight, least squares, risk factors, young adults, smell, overeating, physiological response, satiety, body mass index, test meals
Abstract:
This study sought to explore the association between sensitivity to food cues (sight and smell of food) and (i) body weight (overweight or non-overweight), (ii) typical everyday portion sizes, and (iii) the DEBQ-restraint scale. One hundred and twenty female participants (aged between 18 and 30) were exposed to the sight and smell of pizza for three minutes. Both before and after this period, three measures of food-cue reactivity were taken (ratings of desire to eat, craving, and a measure of desired portion size of the cued food). Separate regression analyses were used to explore the associations between the change in measures of cue reactivity from pre- to post-cue exposure, and (i) an overweight/non-overweight classification, (ii) a measure of participants everyday portion-size selection, and (iii) scores on the DEBQ-restraint scale. This analysis revealed that scores on the DEBQ-restraint scale were not significantly associated with changes in food-cue reactivity. However, individuals identified as overweight, and participants who reported consuming the largest everyday portion sizes, experienced a significantly greater change in their desired portion size of the cued food. The findings suggest that heightened food-cue reactivity might present an under-explored risk factor for overeating, and becoming overweight, and/or maintaining an overweight body shape.
Agid:
757633